Student Success Literature

Student Success Literature

The accordion sections below will take you to articles and abstracts concerning student success among first generation college students, transfer students, and African-American males. We are committed to maintaining these lists and adding to them in the future. Please send recommendations of articles to include to studentsuccess@unc.edu.

Reference Abstract Points of Interest
Yu, T. (2011). A Matter of Degrees. One Day. (11) 17-24. K-12 student preparation and college access vs. college completion.
Demetriou, C. & Schmitz-Sciborski, A. (2011). Integration, motivation, strengths and optimism: Retention theories past, present and future. In R. Hayes (Ed.), Proceedings of the 7th National Symposium on Student Retention, 2011, Charleston. (pp. 300-312). Norman, OK: The University of Oklahoma. A brief historical overview of retention and factors commonly related to undergraduate retention, along with a overview of the recent application of motivational theories to understand undergraduate retention, including attribution theory, expectancy theory, goal setting theory, self-efficacy beliefs, and academic self-concept.
University Leadership Council. (2012) Next Generation Advising: Elevating Practice for Degree Completion and Career Success. The Advisory Board Company. Discussions on student success and completion through an academic advising perspective
Wing Su, D., Capodilupo, C.,Torino., G., Bucceri, J., Holder, A., Nadal, K., & Esquilin, M.   (2007) Racial Microaggressions in Everyday Life. American Psychologist. 62(4), 271–286 An overview of racial microaggressions and their manifestations in counseling/therapy. Includes suggestions on education  and training and research in the helping professions.
Demetriou, C. & Powell, C. (2014). Positive youth development and undergraduate student retention. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice, 16(4), 419-444. Overview of the Positive Youth Development (PYD) perspective and its use in examining student retention. Discusses the benefits of using a developmental and strengths-based perspective to study undergraduate persistence.
University Leadership Council. (2008) The Next Five Percent: Student Retention Strategies for Selective Public Universities. The Advisory Board Company. Retention improvement strategies for academically selective public universities
Shane, J Lopez & Michelle C Louis (2009) The Principles of Strengths-Based Education, Journal of College and Character, 10:4, DOI: 10.2202/1940-1639.1041 Overview of strengths-based education through instruction and advising
Oades, L., Robinson, P., Green., S, & Spence, G. Lindsay G. Oades,(2011): Towards a positive university, The Journal of Positive Psychology: Dedicated to furthering research and promoting good practice, 6:6, 432-439 What is a “positive university?” Uses evidence from positive psychology and organizational scholarship to explore learning and social environments, community and external organizations, faculty work and student residential environments.
Shushok, F. & Hulme, E. (2006) What’s Right with You: Helping Students Find and Use Their Personal Strengths. About Campus. 2-8. Working from student strengths, not deficits. Positive psychology in instruction.
Scully, M. & Rowe, M. (2009) Bystander Training within Organizations. Journal of the International Ombudsman Association, 2 (1), 1. An overview of the bystander effect and discussion of “active bystander” training.
Supiano, B. (2016) Why ‘Nudges’ to Help Students Succeed Are Catching On. The Chronicle of Higher Education.
McGee, E. (2015) Reimagining Critical Race Theory in Education: Mental Health, Healing, and the Pathway to Liberatory Praxis. Educational Theory, 65(5), 491-511.
Permzadian, V. & Crede, M. (2016) Do First-Year Seminars Improve College Grades and Retention? A Quantitative View of Their Overall Effectiveness and an Examination of Moderators of Effectiveness. Review of Educational Research, 86 (1), 277-316.
Reference Abstract Points of Interest
Alessandria, K. & Nelson, E. (2005). Identity development and self-esteem of first-generation American college students: An exploratory study. Journal of College Student Development, 46(1), 3-12. Based on Chickering’s model; differences in self-esteem and identity development among first-generation American  college and non first-generation students were examined.
Barry, L., Hudley, C., Kelly, M. & Cho., S.(2009). Differences in self-reported disclosure of college experiences by first-generation college student status. Adolescence44(173), 55-68 Disclosure of stressful college-related experiences and resources available to reduce stress.
Choy, S. (2001). Students whose parents did not go to college: Postsecondary access, persistence, and attainment. In J. Wirt, et al. (Eds.), The condition of education (pp. xviii-xliii). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics, U.S. Government Printing Office. College enrollment rates vary considerably with parents’ educational attainment.
Clauss-Ehlers, C. & Wibroski, C. (2007).Building educational resilience and social support:  The effects of the educational opportunity fund program among first- and second-generation college students. Journal of College Student Development48(5), 574-584. Educators and psychologists gain a better understanding of how to promote resiliency. Explores students’ resiliency in the face of economic, social and cultural barriers.
Collier, P. & Morgan D. (2008). Is that paper really due today?: Differences in first-generation and traditional college students’ understandings of faculty expectations. Higher Education55, 425-446 Master the “college student” role in order to understand instructors’ expectations and apply their academic skills.
Engle, J. & Tinto, V. (2008). Moving beyond access: College success for low-income, first-generation students. Pell Institute for the Study of Opportunity in Higher Education. What is beyond the surface of access to higher education?
Foster, B. L. (2015, April 9)  What is it like to be poor at an Ivy League School?  The Boston Globe.  Retrieved fromhttp://www.bostonglobe.com/magazine/ An intimate look at the experience of students coming from poorer backgrounds at ivy league schools.
Ghazzawi, I. & Jagannathan, C.(2011).Bridging the gap: The role of outreach programs in granting college access to first generation students. Academy of Educational Leadership Journal15(1), 117-137 Programs that targets first-generation students to help bridge their path to college.
Giancola, J., Munz, D. & Trares, S. (2008).First- versus continuing-generation adult students on college perceptions: Are differences actually because of demographic variance? Adult Education Quarterly, 58(3),  214–228. Profile of changing students from first generation to continuing adult students.
Hahs-Vaughn, D. (2004). The impact of parents’ education level on college students: An analysis using the beginning post secondary students longitudinal study 1990-92/94. Journal of College Student Development45(5), 483-500. Expected highest level of education, entrance exam score, nonacademic experiences, and aspirations for education for first generation students.
Ishitani, T. (2003). A longitudinal approach to assessing attrition behavior among first-generation students:  time-varying effects of pre-college characteristics. Research in Higher Education44(4), 433-449. Unique challenges of first-generation students toward degree attainment.
Ishitani, T. (2006). Studying attrition and degree completion behavior among first-generation college students in the United States. The Journal of Higher Education, 77(5), 861-885. Why certain groups of individuals are less likely to attend and graduate from American institutions of higher education and less likely to enjoy the benefits.
Kim, Young K. & Sax, L. (2009). Student-faculty interaction in research universities:  Differences by student gender, race, social class, and first-generation status. Research in Higher Education50(5), 437-459. Does faculty-student interaction affect GPA, degree aspiration and critical thinking?
Kurotsuchi Inkelas, K., Daver, Z., Vogt, K. &Brown, J. (2007). Living-learning programs and first-generation college students’ academic and social transition to college. Research in Higher Education48(4), 403-434. Role of living-learning programs in facilitating first-generation students’ perceived academic and social transition to college.
Mamiseishvili, K. (2010). Effects of employment on persistence of low-income, first-generation college students. College Student Affairs Journal, 29(1), 65-74. The effects of employment on first to second-year persistence of low-income, first-generation college students.
Macias, L. V. (2013). Choosing Success: A paradigm for empowering first-generation college students. About Campus. 18(5), 17-21. Louis V. Macias reminds us that educators’ attitudes toward first-generation students have a great impact on their eventual success … or failure. Are you serving the best interests of your students with an inspirational, success-oriented mind-set that considers all of their capabilities?
McCarron, G. & Inkelas, K. (2006). The gap between educational aspirations and attainment for first- generation college students and the role of parental involvement.Journal of College Student Development,47(5), 534-549. Role of parental involvement and the connection between educational aspirations. Differences in educational attainment by race/ethnicity, gender and socioeconomic status.
Owens, D., Lacey, K., Rawls, G. & Holbert-Quince, J. (2010). First-generation African American male college students:  Implications for career counselors. The Career Development Quarterly, 58, 291-300. Roadblocks and obstacles encountered by African American men toward upward mobility and economic success.
Pascarella, E., Pierson, C., Wolniak, G. &Terenzini, P. (2004). First-generation college students: Additional evidence on college experiences and outcomes. Journal of Higher Education, 75(3), 249‑284. Differences between first generation and other college students’ experiences and outcomes.
Reason, R., Terezini, P., & Domingo, R. (2006). First things first:  Developing academic competence in the first year of college.Research in Higher Education, 47(2), 149-175. Two-thirds of the knowledge and college skill development occurs in the first 2 years of college. Identifying the individual, organizational, environmental, programmatic, and policy factors that shape academic competence.
Terenzini, P., Springer, L., Yaeger, P.,Pascarella, E. & Nora, A. (1996). First-generation college students: Characteristics, experiences, and cognitive development.Research in Higher Education, 37(1), 1-22. Do the pre-college characteristics of first-generation students differ from those of traditional students?  Do first-generation students’ college experiences differ from those of other students?  What are the educational consequences of any differences on first-year gains in students’ reading, math, and critical-thinking abilities?
Vuong, M., Brown-Welty, S. & Tracz, S.(2010). The effects of self-efficacy on academic success of first-generation college sophomore students. Journal of College Student Development, 51(1), 50-64. Academic success and persistence rates between first-generation and second and beyond generation college sophomore students. Relationship between g.p.a. and persistence rates.
Wohn, D. Y., Ellison, N. B., Khan, M. L., Fewins-Bliss, R. & Gray, R. (April 2013).The role of social media in shaping first-generation high school students’ college aspirations: A social capital lens. Computers & Education, 63, 424-436. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/ S0360131513000080. This study used survey data from a diverse set of high school students (N = 504).  First-generations have less parental support than non first-generations.  Parents, close friends, and Facebook Friends play different roles in college aspirations. Seeking info on social media increased application efficacy for first-generations. Knowing someone who attended college on Facebook increased expectation of college success for first-generations.
Cardoza, K. (2016) First-generation college students are not succeeding in college, and money isn’t the problem. The Washington Post. An overview of obstacles facing first-generation and low-income college students.
Y, Melissa. (2016.) Navigating Campus Together. The Atlantic.  Faculty support of first-generation college students. Challenges FGCS face.
Reference Abstract Points of Interest
Alfonso, M. (2006). The impact of community college attendance on baccalaureate attainment. Research in Higher Education, 47(8), 873-903. Does community college attendance increase the likelihood of obtaining a baccalaureate degree? Enrollment pathways, educational expectations and self-selection
Cotten, S. & Wilson, B. (2006). Student-faculty interactions:  Dynamics and determinants. Higher Education, 51, 487-519. Focus group indicates that students have minimal contact with faculty and do not understand the importance of faculty-staff interactions
Crisp, G. & Nora, A. (2009). Hispanic student success: Factors influencing the persistence and transfer decisions of latino community college students enrolled in developmental education. Research in Higher Education, 51, 175-194. Impact of theoretically-driven predictor variables on the persistence and transfer of Hispanic community college students
Dowd, A., Cheslock, J. & Melguizo, T. (2008). Transfer access from community colleges and the distribution of elite higher education. The Journal of Higher Education, 79(4), 442-472. Contribution of community college transfers to the socioeconomic diversity of elite colleges and universities
Giancola, J., Munz, D. & Trares, S. (2008). First- versus continuing-generation adult students on college perceptions: Are differences actually because of demographic variance? Adult Education Quarterly 58(3): 214-228. Profile of changing students from first generation to continuing adult students
Goldrick-Rab, S. & Pfeffer, F. (2009). Beyond access: Explaining socioeconomic differences in college transfer. Sociology of Education, 82, 101-125. Reducing socioeconomic differences in college transfer requires understanding
Ishitani, T. (2008). How do transfer students survive after “Transfer Shock”?  A longitudinal study of transfer student departure at four-year institutions.  Research in Higher Education, 49(5) (2008), 403-419. Transfer students’ reaction after they encounter a decline in grade point average
Kraemer, B. (1993). Factors affecting Hispanic student transfer behavior. Research in Higher Education, 36(3), 303-322. Cognitive and non-cognitive experiences of Hispanic transfer students
Li, D. (2010). They need help: Transfer students from four-year to four-year institutions. The Review of Higher Education, 33(2), 207-238. Bachelor’s degree attainment among students who first matriculate in four-year institutions but who then transfer to other four-year institutions
Poch, S. & Wolverton, M. (2006). Transfer student graduation efficiency and university administrators: New bedfellows. Innovative Higher Education, 30(4), 233-250. Accountability for public higher education institutions
Tobolowsky, B. & Cox, B. (2012). Rationalizing neglect: An institutional response to transfer students.  The Journal of Higher Education, 83(3), 389-410. Almost 60% of college students attend more than one institute of higher education, but there is increased difficulty in transferring to four-year institutions
Townsend, B. & Wilson, K. (2006). “A hand hold for a little bit”: Factors facilitating the success of community college transfer students to a large research university. Journal of College Student Development, 47(4), 439-456. Transfer process, efforts of the university to orient and assist them, and perceptions of the university versus the community college
Wang, X. (2009). Baccalaureate attainment and college persistence of community college transfer students at four-year institutions. Research in Higher Education, 50, 570-588. Unique factors that determine community college graduation rates at four-year institutions
Wassner, R., Moore, C. & Shulock, N. (2004). Effect of racial/ethnic composition on transfer rates in community colleges: Implications for policy and practice. Research in Higher Education, 45(6), 651-672. Community colleges with higher rates of either Latino or African-American students have lower transfer rates
Wawrzynski, M. & Sedlacek, W. (2003). Race and gender differences in the transfer student experience. Journal of College Student Development,  44(4), 489-501. Expectations, self-perceptions, past academic behaviors and attitudes of transfer students
Jenkins, D. & Fink, J. (2016). Tracking Transfer: New Measures of Institutional and State Effectiveness in Helping Community College Students Attain Bachelor’s Degrees. Community College Research Center/Teachers College, Columbia University. An overview of metrics that policy and institutional leaders can use to assess how well their institutions and systems are serving community college transfer students.
Reference
Abstract Points of Interest
Baez, B. (2003). Affirmative action, diversity, and the politics of representation in higher education. The Journal of Higher Education, 74(1), 96-107. Struggle over affirmative action, recent lawsuits and decisions
Fischer, M. (2007). Settling into Campus Life: Differences by Race/Ethnicity in College Involvement and Outcomes. Journal of Higher Education, 78(2), 125-161. Explored outcomes of increases in minority student enrollment in higher education
Fries-Britt, S. & Griffin, K. (2007). The black box:  How high-achieving blacks resist stereotypes about black Americans. Journal of College Student Development, 48(5), 509-524. Perceptions about black students
Griffin, K. (2006). Striving for success:  A qualitative exploration of competing theories of high-achieving black college students’ academic motivation. Journal of College Student Development, 47(4), 384-400. Self-determination theory; Socio-cognitive theory; Attribution theory
Harper, S. Selected Works of Shaun R. Harper, Ph.D., national expert on minoritized male student persistence and success
Hamrick, F. & Stage, F. (2003). College dispositions at high minority, low enrollment schools. The Review of Higher Education, 27(2), 151-168. Explores the transition of minority students into higher education
Herndon, M. & Hirt, J. (2004). Black students and their families:  What leads to success in college. Journal of Black Studies, 34(4), 489-513. Eight connections between black students and their families
Kalsner, L. & Pistole, M. (2003). College adjustment in a multiethnic sample: Attachment, separation-individuation, and ethnic identity. Journal of College Student Development, 44(1), 92-109. Parental attachment questionnaire; multi-group ethnic identity measure
Lee, W. (2002) Culture and Institutional Climate: Influences on Diversity in Higher Education. The Review of Higher Education, 25(3), 360-368. History of higher education; Diversity in higher education
Mehan, H., Hubbard, L. & Villanueva, I. (1994). Forming academic identities: Accommodation without assimilation among involuntary minorities. Anthropology & Education Quarterly, 25(2), 91-117. Explores how institutional mechanisms influence student ideology
Owens, D., Lacey, K., Rawls, G. & Holbert-Quince, J. (2010). First-generation African American male college students: Implications for career counselors. The Career Development Quarterly, 58, 291-300. Roadblocks and obstacles encountered by African American men toward upward mobility and economic success
Zajacova, A., Lynch, S. & Espenshade, T. (2005). Self-efficacy, stress, and academic success in college. Research in Higher Education, 46(6), 677-706. Academic performance of largely nontraditional students, mainly immigrant and minority
Swanson, N., Vaughan, A., & Wilkinson, B. (2015) First-Year Seminars: Supporting Male College Students’ Long-Term Academic Success. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory & Practice, 0(0), 1-15.
Reference Abstract Points of Interest
Freshmen Retention Rates. (2013) U.S. News and World Report As many as one in three first-year students doesn’t make it back for sophomore year. The reasons run the gamut, of course, from family problems to loneliness to academic struggles to a lack of money. If schools you’re considering have a low freshman retention rate, you’ll want to ask the admissions office why. Some colleges do a great job of taking care of their freshmen; some don’t. The retention rates shown below, from lowest to highest, are the average proportion of freshmen entering starting in fall 2005 through fall 2008 who returned to school the following fall. (The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is listed as achieving a 96% retention rate.)
O’Shaughnessy, L. (2013) 25 state universities with the happiest freshmen. CBS.news.com If you want to attend universities where students are happy, try looking for schools where students stick around after their freshmen year.
Carlson, S. (2016) Poor Kids, Limited Horizons. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Low-income students struggle to bridge the gap between career aspirations and financial reality. Addresses “career privilege” and the factors pushing poor students to aim low career-wise, rather than take risks.
Fischer, K. (2016). Engine of Inequality. The Chronicle of Higher Education.
Godsey, M. (2015). When Schools Overlook Introverts. The Atlantic.
Kirp, D. (2016) Conquering the Freshman Fear of Failure. The New York Times.
Gannon, K. (2016). The Absolute Worst Way to Start the Semester. https://chroniclevitae.com/news
Carlson, S. (2016) When $300 Would Keep a Student from Dropping Out. The Chronicle of Higher Education.
Saul, S. (2016) Campuses Cautiously Train Freshmen Against Subtle Insults. The New York Times.
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