Mindset-Students

The 8th Annual Student Success Conference

A Coordinated Culture of Care for Student Success

March 6, 2017
William and Ida Friday Conference Center

“[Student success] efforts are often described in terms of programs and strategies. While such initiatives contribute to the success and persistence of students, alone they possess marginal power to impact retention outcomes. The true power any institution has to affect academic performance and enrollment behavior is the campus culture.”
-Black (2010) Creating a Retention Culture

We envision a coordinated culture of care as a culture where every member of the Carolina community is called upon to support and facilitate student success. It is a culture where undergraduates are seen as the heart of this university and it is everyone’s job to care for students. This means that every interaction a student has on this campus is a learning opportunity and has the potential to influence success. All employees – faculty, staff, administrators, healthcare providers, service workers – must be a part of this culture dedicated to care and education even if one’s functional job responsibilities are not education focused. To cultivate a culture of care, each person within our community must possess cultural competence and create safe spaces for students to explore academically and personally.
– Cynthia Demetriou (2017), Associate Dean for Undergraduate Retention

This year’s conference:

  • Described an ethos of care in higher education and explore why a culture of care increases student outcomes.
  • Explored tangible strategies for coordinating and collaborating across departments, schools and units to cultivate a culture of care.
  • Provided space for cross-departmental synergy and collaboration toward innovative ideas for everyday work inspiring a coordinated culture of care at Carolina.

FEATURED SPEAKERS


Timothy L. Hall
President of Mercy College

Brett Carter
Associate Vice Chancellor and Dean of Students within the Division of Student Affairs at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Desirée Rieckenberg
Senior Associate Dean of Students & Director, Office of the Dean of Students, University of North Carolina

Amy Locklear Hertel
Director of the American Indian Center and Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Social Work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

ORDER OF ACTIVITIES and RELEVANT MATERIALS

8:30 a.m. Check-In
9:00 a.m. Welcome
9:15 a.m. Cynthia Demetriou––Conceptualizing a Coordinated Culture of Care
9:30 a.m. Keynote––Tim Hall: A Revolutionary Culture of Coordinated Care for Student Success
10:45 a.m. Plenary Speaker––Brett Carter: UNCG Cares
11:30 a.m. Collaborative Discussion
12:00 p.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. Desirée Rieckenberg: The Circle of Care: A Coordinated Approach to Student Success and Resiliency
1:45 p.m. Collaborative Discussion
2:30 p.m. Plenary––Amy Locklear Hertel: Informed by Culture, Created by Design: Indigeneity in the Academy
3:15 p.m. Closing

Each year, the Office of Undergraduate Retention and the Division of Student Affairs at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) partner with colleagues from across campus to provide a day-long conference for faculty and staff on current issues in undergraduate student success.

The 8th Annual Student Success Conference – A Coordinated Culture of Care for Student Success (2017) – was made possible by the coordinated partnership of Undergraduate Education, the Office of Undergraduate Retention, Student Affairs, Summer School, and the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.

PAST ANNUAL CONFERENCES

The 2016 Student Success Conference: Growth Mindset

Each year, the Office of Undergraduate Retention and the Division of Student Affairs at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) partner with colleagues from across campus to provide a day-long conference for faculty and staff on current issues in undergraduate student success.

Growth mindset (Dweck, 2006), the belief that abilities can be developed through dedication and hard work, is a theoretical framework applied to student success initiatives across the education pipeline. While individuals with a fixed mindset believe their basic qualities, like their intelligence or talent, are unchangeable fixed traits, people with a growth mindset believe that intelligence is malleable and individuals have significant capacity to change. Research suggests that developing a growth mindset may result in positive educational outcomes.

This day-long conference explored the following questions: What is growth mindset? How can growth mindset be applied to undergraduate student success? How can faculty and staff at UNC-CH apply growth mindset to their current work with undergraduates?

This conference was a gathering of faculty and staff at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill that enhanced our understanding of how mindset (of students, faculty, and professionals) can impact student success. The 2016 Conference was hosted by the Office of Undergraduate Retention, with generous support by the Office of Undergraduate Education, the Division of Student Affairs, and the Summer School.

CONFERENCE GOALS

  • Enhance participant knowledge of mindset theory as applied to undergraduate student’s success, including:
    • Understanding the distinction between growth and fixed mindsets.
    • Examining the research related to mindset theory and its application to college students.
    • Learning how to integrate theory and research related to mindset in order to develop principles for practice.
    • Developing at least one strategy for promoting a growth mindset in their students.
    • Becoming aware of specific feedback techniques that promote a growth mindset.
    • Applying growth mindset approaches with relevant case studies.
  • Identify campus experiences that contribute to increasing growth mindset.
  • Provide an opportunity for departments to collaborate on potential strategies for promoting growth mindset in college.

SUGGESTED RESOURCES & READINGS FOR CONTINUING THE DISCUSSION

Arnett, J. J. (2000). Emerging adulthood: A theory of development from the late teens through the twenties.American psychologist55(5), 469.

Dweck, C. (2006). Mindset: The new psychology of success. New York: Random House.

Sriram, R. (2014). Rethinking intelligence: The role of mindset in promoting success for academically high-risk studentsJournal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory & Practice15(4), 515-536.

Yeager, D. S. and Dweck, C. S. (2012). Mindsets that promote resilience: When students believe that personal characteristics can be developed. Educational Psychologist47, 302–314.

Questions for Continuing the Conversation

SUMMER SCHOOL: GROWTH MINDSET GRANT OPPORTUNITY

As we shared at the conference, attendees and their colleagues are invited to apply for grant funding to enhance growth mindset amongst UNC-Chapel Hill students over the summer.

The Following Parties Are Eligible For Grant Funding 

  • Individual University staff or faculty
  • University program, office, or department

Note: You must have attended the conference to be eligible for funding.

Requirements

All questions on the Summer School Growth Mindset Grant Application form must be completed with an answer or insert “not applicable.”  The committee will not review an incomplete application.

To make your grant application a strong contender for funding, please keep the following items in mind:

  • The grant application consists of two parts.
  1. Part I requires contact and program information and the executive summary.
  2. Part II requires detailed budget and financial information.

Supplementary materials (student testimonials, photos, brochures, etc.) may be attached.

  • Applications should demonstrate a sincere interest in undergraduate student needs, and programs/events must totally benefit students. Stronger consideration will be given to programs or projects that provide a clear connection to the university-wide definition of
    student success. See unc.edu/defining-student-success for the definition.
  • Applications should demonstrate clear references to the theoretical framework for mindset in relevant literature.
  • Individual applicants should demonstrate support from their department chair or director.

Completed Grant Applications are due no later than 5:00pm on March 22, 2016 to Candice Powell (candicef@email.unc.edu).

CONFERENCE MATERIALS

Conference Program

Presentations:

Keynote Speaker – Dr. Martha Casazza
Mindset: Its Powerful Impact on Achievement

Plenary Speaker – Dr. Jeffery Greene
Mindsets, Myths, and Messages: How We Promote (and Undermine) Growth

Applying Mindset to Teaching & Learning: Dr. Jeannie Loeb, Dr. Cheryl Moy, Dr. Jennifer Park
There are many opportunities to encourage students’ growth mindset in academic courses. This session will explore cross-disciplinary strategies that can help students understand and apply mindset concepts to academic tasks and thriving in the classroom. The presenters will include specific examples of strategies they have used in their courses, the outcomes of their efforts and considerations for additional strategies. Attendees will also discuss ideas for incorporating mindset concepts in their own courses and teaching approaches.
Part 1 – Dr. Loeb
Part 2 – Dr. Moy
Part 3 – Dr. Park

Meaning Making Tools to Enhance Student Mindsets through Student Services: Gregory Bocchino
How can staff in student support services encourage students to develop a mindset for success in college? This session will focus on creative activities that can increase students’ self-awareness, embrace challenges, persist in the face of setbacks, and capitalize on their strengths. The activities discussed will be particularly applicable to orientation and transition programs, career and course selection discussions, admissions programs, and programs related to student health, academic performance, behavior and discipline. In particular, attendees will explore how they can use tools such as the a values clarification card sort, force field analysis activity, StrengthsFinder assessment, and the Myers Briggs Type Indicator within these contexts and how to provide students with feedback and guidance to “stretch” and “grow.”
Meaning Making Tools to Enhance Student Mindsets through Student Services – Part 1
Meaning Making Tools to Enhance Student Mindsets through Student Services – Part 2

Encouraging Growth Mindset in Student Leaders & Co-Curricular Experiences – A Brainstorming Session: Bobby Kunstman & Kate Kryder
Developing undergraduate students to become the next great generation of scholars and leaders is a top priority at Carolina. This priority is evidenced by the dozens of formal leadership programs and courses across our campus. This session will be a highly collaborative time for conference participants to exchange ideas about ways to infuse growth mindset concepts into student leader training and cohort experiences.

Coaching to Growth: Partners from the Learning Center & the Writing Center at UNC-Chapel Hill
This session invites attendees to experience and experiment with the kind of academic coaching students receive when they visit the Writing Center or Learning Center. With writing and time management as our starting points, staff members and attendees will work in small groups to sample coaching skills and learn how our academic coach approach helps students grow.
Writing Center Flyer
Learning Center Flyer

STUDENT SUCCESS CONFERENCE IN THE NEWS

Partnering Together for Student Success, The College of Arts & Sciences at UNC-Chapel Hill

Overview

On March 3, 2015, colleagues from across the university gathered for “Thriving in College.”  Thriving in college is defined as optimal functioning in three key areas that contribute to student success and persistence: a) academic engagement and performance, b) interpersonal relationships, and c) psychological wellbeing (Schreiner, 2010). Thriving college students are engaged academically, socially, and emotionally. Thriving students experience a sense of community and a level of psychological well-being that contributes to their persistence toward graduation and allows them to gain maximum benefit from being in college (Schreiner, Pothoven, Nelson, & McIntosh, 2009).

Conference Guide

by Ryan Comfort, Academic Advisor

Presentations

Posters

Registered Guests

References

  • Schreiner, L. A. (2010). The “Thriving Quotient”: A new vision for student success. About Campus, 15(2), 2-10.
  • Schreiner, L. A., Pothoven, S., Nelson, D., & McIntosh, E. (2009, November). College student thriving: Predictors of success and retention. Paper presented at the Association for the Study of Higher Education Annual Conference, Vancouver, B.C.

Sponsors

The 2015 Student Success Conference was possible through the partnership of the Office of Undergraduate Education and the Division of Student Affairs with support from the UNC School of Education and Starfish Retention Solutions.

OVERVIEW

On February 7, 2014, colleagues from across the University came together for “High Impact Carolina.” This interactive working day focused on recommendations from the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) monograph, High-Impact Educational Practices: What They Are, Who Has Access to Them, and Why They Matter. The conference featured talks from national experts, including Tia Brown McNair, Senior Director for Student Success in the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Student Success at AAC&U, and Betsy O. Barefoot, Vice President for the John N. Gardner Institute. 

Conference Guide

Presentations

Posters

Registered Guests

Additional Resources

Overview

On January 27, 2012, faculty, staff and students from across campus came together to explore the habits, perspectives and behaviors of successful male students of color. The day was designed to be a dynamic, productive gathering focused on better understanding the success and the obstacles to success for undergraduate men of color. Additionally, this day provided an opportunity to reflect on current and best practices and consider areas for enhancement. An expert on minority male student success and University of Pennsylvania professor, Dr. Shaun Harper, provided insight on the larger, national perspective and led us through conversations specific to Carolina.


Videos

Materials

Next Steps Activity

Additional Resources

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